War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0211 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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town, and after they had burned railroad bridge, fought them an hour, drove them toward Shelbyville, and pursued 3 miles till stopped by darkness. On 7th, Mitchell, with main cavalry force, Crook having joined him, overtook them at Shelbyville [Farmington] and put them to flight, killing 100 and capturing 200. Butterfield, who came up during this action with Lowe's cavalry and a regiment of Granger's infantry from Wartrace, reports that Mitchell will probably capture and destroy all of Wheeler's force.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 8-11 a.m.

A sergeant of Fifth [rebel] Kentucky Regiment, who deserted to us this morning, says it was understood in the rebel camps in Chattanooga Valley that the firing beyond Missionary Ridge on the 6th was occasioned by the refusal of a brigade of Georgia militia, 5,000 strong, to cross the State line. The result of fight deserter does not know.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 8.

General Rousseau, who seems to be regarded throughout this army as an ass of eminent gifts, having reported to General Thomas that you had inquired how the army would like to have him in the chief command, that officer has sent a confidential friend to me to say that while he would gladly accept any command out of this department to which you might see fit to assign him, he could not consent to become the successor of general Rosecrans, because he would not do anything to give countenance to the suspicion that he had intrigued against his commander. Besides he has as perfect confidence in capacity and fidelity of Rosecrans as he had in those of General Buell.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 8-1 p.m.

The consolidation of the two corps is universally well received, and being followed by a general reorganization of the army, with consolidation of reduced regiments and new and more equal combinations of brigades and divisions, must produce the most happy consequences. The men, however, of the consolidated corps are somewhat troubled by letters from home, showing that their friends regard the consolidation as a token of disgrace and punishment. It is very desirable to obviate any such feeling, especially as of the six divisions composing the consolidated corps, three fought with heroism and