War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0207 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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[Rosecrans], who, when I said Negley ought to be shot, answered, "That is my opinion." He added that he should have him punished, yet now he has determined to do nothing more than apply to have him relieved and ordered elsewhere.

Engineers are now engaged upon the pontoon bridge to cross the Tennessee at mouth of Lookout Creek. Nothing done yet on interior fortifications here, without which a very large garrison is necessary.

General Thomas desires me to say to you that he is deeply obliged to you for good opinion.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 4-1 p.m.

Sheridan reports rebels very active building works on Lookout Mountain, and thinks they are massing cannon there.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 5-9 a.m.

All quiet in front. Rebels seem to be intrenching themselves, but this cannot be positively known, as their lines are covered by woods. One of our trestle bridges over the Tennessee here gave way last night, owing to a rise in the river, and the other bridge threatens to fail. A new pontoon bridge will take their place to-day. Two 30-pounder Parrotts have arrived and are placed in Fort Wood, on our left. The largest rifle guns in this army placed in Fort Wood, on our left. The largest rifle guns in this army previously were 3-inch.

At McMinnville the rebels captured a Tennessee infantry regiment, about 250 strong, also one locomotive and eleven cars, which they burned. Notice of their approach and full instructions had been sent there in season. Burnside telegraphed last night inquiring if it was true rebel cavalry had crossed Tennessee. As he was not only notified of the fact four days ago, but promised to send his cavalry in pursuit, this inquiry is astonishing. It proves that he has done nothing. Had he taken the proper measures to protect the left flank of this army this disaster could not have happened, and unless he acts now he will probably be responsible for worse calamities.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 5, 1863.

I learn that part or all of my report of the second day of the great battle was translated and shown about at Nashville on the evening of that day. Horace Maynard even repeated at Cincinnati, a few days ago, a whole sentence of it. General R. S. Granger is said to have had it. I have inquired of him respecting the facts, and