War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0205 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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personal. He refused before because a battle was imminent and he unacquainted with the combinations. No such reason now exists, and I presume that he would accept.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

NASHVILLE, September 30.

Nothing important occurred at Chattanooga yesterday. Four regiments, Steinwehr's division, passed through here to Bridgeport last night. One division of Sherman's corps arrived at Louisville yesterday. I return to Chattanooga this afternoon.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, October 3-12 m.

Yours of 30th arrived here at midnight last night. Wheeler, with a force of cavalry, forded the Tennessee Wednesday night [30th] at various places above and below Washington. The highest statement concerning this force is that it consisted of two divisions; the lowest, two brigades. Crook, with two small brigades, was lying along the river watching the fords, but was unable to prevent the rebels from crossing.

Immediately on receiving this news, Rosecrans ordered General Edward M. McCook with a division of cavalry about Bridgeport to hasten to the Sequatchie Valley to protect our wagon trains. McCook marched Thursday, but the violent storm that day prevented his reaching Anderson, the distance being 39 miles, in season, and Wheeler fell upon a train yesterday morning at the foot of the mountain where the road rises out of the Sequatchie Valley. The Twenty-first Kentucky Infantry, which was there to guard the wagons were destroyed. How many were lost is unknown, but probably from 250 to 300, all belonging to Fourteenth Corps. One-third of them contained ammunition. McCook being not far off soon attacked the rebels and drove them up the valley, but we have no particulars. When McCook was ordered up from Bridgeport, Burnside was also requested to send his cavalry down the west bank of the Tennessee to cut off Wheeler's retreat, and if he has done so it is hardly possible Wheeler should escape. Under Bragg's agreement, 1,742 Union wounded have been brought from Crawfish Spring within our lines, and about 750 remain in his hands, of whom one-third can be moved, leaving 500 severe cases which must remain. In return for those already delivered to us he demands an equal number of well men from among rebel prisoners taken at Chickamauga. This Rosecrans has decisively refused.

Of our surgeons, 52 were left behind with our wounded, and 4 rebel surgeons came into our hands. The latter Rosecrans released, and Bragg thereupon released 4 of ours, but refuses to release any more on the ground that we have detained rebel surgeons at the East con-