War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0204 KY.,SW.VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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from McCown's division, about 3,000 strong, while Governor Brown furnished 15,000 Georgia militia armed with shot-guns and squirrel rifles, who were not to remain after the battle.

Upsham says Bragg had no intention to flank or outwit Rosecrans, but simply to crush his army, and that the result is felt to be failure. General Gilem tells me he will have the Northwestern Railroad to Reynoldsburg finished two months hence.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

NASHVILLE, September 30.

Six thousand one hundred wounded are suddenly accumulated here from the battle-field of the Chickamauga, and, on representation of the medical officers that it is indispensable for the proper care of these wounded that Surgeon Clendenin, who has been ordered to West Virginia, should remain here for the present, I have taken the liberty to authorize it until you can be heard from. Please confirm or withdraw the permission thus given.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

NASHVILLE, September 30.

Since my dispatch of the 27th, several officers of prominence and worth-such as General Garfield, General Wood, and Colonel Opdycke-have spontaneously waited upon me to represent the state of feeling in the army upon the subject of that dispatch.

They all confirm in the strongest manner the tenor of that report, and tell me in addition that the same conviction pervades all ranks; in fact, I was myself aware that the soldiers believed victory to be impossible so long as McCook and Crittenden command army corps.

The other day, as General Rosecrans was making one of those little speeches to a group of men which it is his constant practice to deliver as he passes among them, a soldier asked him if General McCook still commanded the Twentieth Army Corps. "Yes," was the answer. "Then the right will be licked again," said the man; and all the others agreed with him. This Colonel Opdycke represents as the unanimous sentiment respecting both the generals in question, and I have no doubt he is right.

I learn also, confidentially, from these officers and others, that the soldiers have lost their attachment for General Rosecrans since he failed them in the battle, and that they now do not cheer him until they are ordered to do so by officers.

On the other hand, General Thomas has risen to the highest point in their esteem, as he has in that of every one who witnessed his conduct on that unfortunate and glorious day; and should there be a change in the chief command, there is no other man whose appointment would be so welcome to this army. I would earnestly recommend that in such an event his merits be considered. He is certainly an officer of the very highest qualities, soldierly and