War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0203 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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having withdrawn his division from the battle on Sunday without orders and with his ranks undisturbed, he having been directed to post himself behind Baird on the extreme left; and all parties feel that Van Cleve ought to be relieved on account of his age, and the utter confusion of mind and incapacity which he manifested on Saturday and Sunday both.

C. A. DANA.

[Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 28-4 a.m.

All quiet along the lines. Enemy apparently lying still, except occasional picket skirmishing. We are fortifying. We know that rebels have force at all points in Chattanooga Valley in our front, but their principal camps are on the Chickamauga, just over Missionary Ridge. Our signal officers have deciphered signals from their signal stations showing that Longstreet is still here. We learn from prisoners and from a flag of truce Rosecrans sent out yesterday that two brigades of Longstreet's corps have come up since the battle. Bragg yesterday agreed to surrender our wounded after paroling them, and to allow supplies to be sent to those who cannot be moved. I go to Nashville to-day; will be here again Thursday.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

NASHVILLE, September 29-8 a.m.

Arrived here at 6 a.m. All quiet at Bridgeport, except that pickets occasionally fire across the Tennessee. No considerable rebel force in that vicinity. Railroad bridge there will soon be done, and that over Running Water also ready to put up. Hooker will first be stationed at Wauhatchie in Lookout Valley, at the junction of the Chattanooga and Trenton and Memphis and Charleston Rail roads. Weather warm, pleasant.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

NASHVILLE, September 29.

An intelligent refugee from Georgia arrived here yesterday. His name is Upsham and he has a brother who is post quartermaster at Dalton, which place he left two days after Chickamauga battle. He says that the facts he states were learned by him in his brother's office.

According to his report when Bragg retreated from Chattanooga he had but 25,000 men. He was re-enforced by Longstreet, with the divisions of Hood and McLaws, 21,000 men; together with Buckner, from East Tennessee, with 10,000; by Joe Johnston, from Mississippi, with the division of Breckinridge, 8,000 strong, and one brigade