War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0201 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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CHATTANOOGA, September 25-11.30 a.m.

Advices from Burnside received this morning. He was at Carter's Depot 23rd; had defeated rebels there and burned bridge. Was about to move hitherward with whole available force. Will probably get here about Wednesday next week.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 25-9 p.m.

No change of importance. Rebels still remain in Chattanooga Valley; report they had withdrawn erroneous. Telegraph cut today between here and Bridgeport. New line ordered on north side Tennessee.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 26-10 a.m.

Enemy pushed forward his pickets on our left at 5 a.m. to-day, driving in ours. Sharp skirmish ensued, rebels being driven at 6.30. General Palmer received severe flesh wound while standing in embrasure of one of our forts. Our loss otherwise inconsiderable. We took several prisoners from Breckinridge's division, who report the main rebel force encamped along Missionary Ridge. We have reports that rebel cavalry have appeared in Lookout Valley, threatening Bridgeport, but other evidence contradict them. [Rosecrans] is about to lay a bridge across Tennessee at mouth of Lookout Creek, so that he can operate from here in that valley without crossing the mountain. Weather bright, cool, pleasant.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 27.

A very serious fermentation reigns in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Army Corps, and, indeed, throughout this whole army, growing out of events connected with the battle on Sunday last.

I have already reported that the generals of those two corps left the field of battle amid the rout of the right wing, made their way here with the crowd of fugitives, and went to sleep, while one division of each corps remained fighting with the left wing to the end. The generals of division and of brigade feel deeply this desertion of their commanders, and say, as I am informed on good evidence, for only two or three have spoken to me on the subject, that they can no longer serve under such superiors, and that if it is required of them they must resign. This feeling is universal among them, including men like Major-Generals Palmer and Sheridan and Brigadier-Generals Wood, Johnson, and Hazen. What is the senti-