War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0196 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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11 [p.m.] unless prevented by enemy who have been fighting him this afternoon. Mitchell also reports from our right flank, where he is watching with his cavalry, that two divisions of Longstreet are advancing on him. There is no time to wait for re-enforcements, and [Rosecrans] is determined not to abandon Chattanooga and [Bridgeport] without another effort. Battle here will probably be fought to-morrow or next day. Granger, who is here, says that in yesterday's battle rebels were finally defeated, and if Thomas had not withdrawn during night enemy would not have dared attack further. In last two assaults our troops fought with bayonet, their ammunition being quite exhausted.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 22-3 p.m.

Whole army withdrew into this place last night without difficulty, leaving only necessary outposts and parties of observation.

The troops arrived here about midnight in wonderful spirits, considering their excessive fatigues and heavy losses. They have been working all day improvising rifle-pits. Line of defense is about 3 miles long, crossing the peninsula some 2 miles from its extremity. It includes two redoubts erected by rebels, and is pretty strong, though much weakened by a blunder made by somebody in pushing McCook's wing half mile forward of line designed by Chief Engineer Morton. This cannot be remedied to-day, but if possible mistake repaired to-night. McCook holds the right, that noble old hero Thomas the center, the weakest part of the line, and Crittenden the left. The enemy have been approaching all morning in three columns, resisted by our advance parties, but the artillery firing has now drawn very near and battle may be fought before dark. Rosecrans estimates our effective at 30,000 besides cavalry, but I fear our numbers are hardly so great as that. There are provisiions here for fifteen days. Mass of cavalry under Mitchell has been sent across river to guard the road to Bridgeport via Jasper, and to strengthen Wilder, who is watching fords above here. Mitchell will there find forage for horses, of which none is here. Only cavalry remaining on this side are Minty's brigade, in front toward Rossville and Missionary Ridge, and Watkins' brigade, left behind by Mitchell and now making its way over Lookout Mountain.

How large force enemy brings here, you know as well as we.

He was awfully slaughtered on Sunday, but certainly outnumbers this army even if he has received no re-enforcements. Our losses on that awful day are still uncertain. Four thousand wounded have already been sent hence to Bridgeport. General King, commanding brigade of regulars, went into action with 1,600 brought out only 450. He lost two battalions taken prisoners. General Baird, who commanded Rousseau's division, estimates his loss in prisoners at 2,000 though his line never flinched. This army looks anxiously for re-enforcements. No signs of approach of Burnside.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]