War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0194 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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be brought here by the Chattanooga Valley road, which still is free from rebels.

The number of the enemy yesterday and to-day I estimate at not less than 70,000. He was able to touch and threaten our lines at all points, and still form the tremendous columns whose onset drove Thomas back and dissolved Sheridan and Davis in panic. I learn from General Rosecrans, who himself took part in the effort previously to the final stampede of Sheridan's division, that that general charged the advancing columns of the enemy in flank. The charge was too spasmodic to be effectual; our men became involved in the rushing mass and did not break it. Rosecrans has telegraphed Burnside to hurry forward his re-enforcements. The advance of his cavalry is reported as having reached Cleveland yesterday morning.

Some gentlemen of Rosecrans' staff say Chickamauga is not very much worse than was Murfreesborough. I can testify to the conspicuous and steady gallantry of Rosecrans on the field. He made all possible efforts to rally the broken columns; nor to I see that there was any fault in the disposition of his forces.

The disaster might perhaps have been avoided but for the blunder of McCook in marching back from his previous advanced position. That blunder cost us four days of precious time.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 21-1 p.m.

Deserters and captives both report that Ewell's corps is on its way to join Bragg. One of the latter taken this morning by Thomas, says the corps has arrived, though not in season to fight yesterday. Is now moving on the Tennessee River above this. Longstreet as we know

is here.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 21-2 p.m.

Garfield chief of staff, becoming separated from Rosecrans in the route of our right wing yesterday, made his way to the left, and spent the afternoon and night with General Thomas. He arrived here before noon to-day, having witnessed the sequel of the battle in that part of the field. Thomas, finding himself cut off from Rosecrans and the right, at once brought his seven divisions into position for independent fighting. Refusing both his right and left, his line assumed the form of a horse-shoe posted along the slope and crest of a partly wooded ridge. He was soon joined by Granger from Rossville, with the brigade of McCook and division of Steedman, and with these forces firmly maintained the fight till after dark. Our troops were as immovable as the rocks they stood on. The enemy hurled against them repeatedly the dense columns which had routed Davis and Sheridan in the morning, but every onset was repulsed with dreadful slaughter. Falling first on one and then another point of our lines, for hours the rebels vainly sought to break them.