War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0192 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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but little. At Rossville are 8,000 men of Reserve Corps not engaged at all. We have lost no prominent officer. Reynolds safe. Weather cool; favorable to wounded.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

[SEPTEMBER 19]-8 P. M.

We have taken about 250 prisoners, including men from thirty different regiments. We have captured 10 guns and lost 7. I cannot learn that we have lost any considerable number of prisoners. Battle-field is 3 miles north from Crawfish Spring, and about 8 south of Rossville. It is mainly in a forest 4 miles square.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

[SEPTEMBER 19]-11 p.m.

Dr. Perin, medical director of this department, estimates the number of our wounded as not exceeding 2,000.

[C. A. DANA.]

[Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.]

CHATTANOOGA, September 20-4 p.m.

My report to-day is of deplorable importance. Chickamauga is as fatal a name in our history as Bull Run. The battle began late this morning. The first cannon was fired at 9, but no considerable firing till 10. Previous to 10 Rosecrans rode the whole length of lines. All seemed promising, except columns of dust within rebel lines moving north, and report from our right that enemy had been felling timber there during night. Soon after the battle commenced Thomas, who held the left, began to call for re-enforcements. Then about 12 came word that he had been forced to retire to his second line. Re-enforcements were sent him, and McCook's whole corps, which was on right and as reserve in the center, was ordered to his assistance. Wood, of Crittenden's corps, and Van Cleve, who held the front in center, were also ordered to left, where the fury of cannonade showed that enormous rebel force was massed. Their places were filled by Davis and Sheridan, of McCook's corps. But hardly had these divisions taken their places in the line when the rebel fire, which had slackened on our left ever since it was turned and driven back about three-quarters of an hour previously, suddenly burst over in enormous volume upon our center.

Never in any battle I have witnessed was there such a mass of cannon and musketry. This lasted some twenty minutes, and then Van Cleve, on Thomas' right, was seen to give way, but in tolerable order, soon after which the lines of Sheridan and Davis broke in disorder, borne down by immense columns of enemy. These columns