War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0047 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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SECOND DIVISION.

Brig. General GEORGE CROOK.

First Brigade.

Colonel ROBERT H. G. MINTY.

3rd Indiana (battalion), Lieutenant Colonel Robert Klein.

4th Michigan, Major Horace Gray.

7th Pennsylvania, Lieutenant Colonel James J. Seibert.

4th United States, Captain James B. McIntyre.

Second Brigade.

Colonel ELI LONG.

2nd Kentucky, Colonel Thomas P. Nicholas.

1st Ohio, Lieutenant Colonel Valentine Cupp, Major Thomas J. Patten.

3rd Ohio, Lieutenant Colonel Charles B. Seidel.

4th Ohio, Lieutenant Colonel Oliver P. Robie.

Artillery.

Chicago (Illinois) Board of Trade Battery, Captain James H. Stokes.

No. 3. Report of Major General William S. Rosecrans,

U. S. Army,commanding the Army of the Cumberland.

[OCTOBER -, 1863.]

THE OCCUPATION OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE AND PASSAGE OVER THE CUMBERLAND MOUNTAINS.

The rebel army, after its expulsion form Middle Tennessee,crossed the Cumberland Mountains by way of the Tantallon and University roads,then moved down Battle Creek,and crossed the Tennessee River on bridges, it is said, near the mouth of Battle Creek and at Kelley's Ferry, and on the railroad bridge at Bridgeport. They destroyed a part of the latter after having passed over it, and retired to Chattanooga and Tyner's Station,leaving guards along the river. On their arrival at Chattanooga, they commenced immediately to throw up some defensive fieldworks at that place and also at each of the crossing of the Tennessee as far up as Blythe's Ferry.

Our Troops,having pursued the rebels as far as supplies and the state of the roads rendered it practicable, took position from McMinnville to Winchester, with advances at Pelham and Stevenson. The latter soon after moved to Bridgeport in time to save from total destruction a saw-mill there,but not to prevent the destruction of the railroad bridge.

After the expulsion of Bragg's forces from Middle Tennessee,the next objective point of this army was Chattanooga. It commands the southern entrance into East Tennessee,the most valuable if not the chief sources of supplies of coal for the manufactories and machine-shops of the Southern States, and is one of the great gateways through the mountains to the champaign counties of Georgia and Alabama.