War of the Rebellion: Serial 050 Page 0035 Chapter XLII. THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN.

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General Rosecrans will occupy Dalton or some point on the railroad to close all access from Atlanta, and also the mountain passes on the west. This being done, it will be determined whether the movable forces shall advance into Georgia and Alabama, or into the Valley of Virginia and North Carolina.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

On the 12th, General Rosecrans telegraphed that although he was "sufficiently strong for the enemy then in his front," there were indications that the rebels intended to turn his flanks and cut his communications. He therefore desired that Burnside should move down his infantry toward Chattanooga on his left, and that Grant should cover the Tennessee River toward Whitesburg to prevent any raid on Nashville. He was of opinion that no troops had been sent east from Bragg's army, but that Bragg was being re-enforced by Loring from Mississippi.

On the night of the 13th, General Foster telegraphed from Fort Monroe that "trains of cars had been heard running all the time, day and night, for the last thirty-six hours, on the Petersburg and Richmond road, evidently indicating a movement of troops in some direction;" and on the morning of the 14th, that Longstreet's corps was reported to be going south through North Carolina. General Meade had been directed to ascertain, by giving battle if necessary, whether any of Lee's troops had left, It was not till the 14th that he could give me any information on this point, and then he telegraphed:

My judgment,formed of the variety of meager and conflicting testimony, is, that Lee's army been reduced by Longstreet's corps, and perhaps by some regiments from Ewell's and Hill's.

As soon as I received General Rosecrans' and General Foster's telegrams of the 13th, I sent the following telegrams to General Burnside, Rosecrans, Hurlbut, Grant, and Sherman:

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C., September 13, 1863-1 p.m.

Major-General BURNSIDE,

Knoxville:

It is important that all the available forces of your command be pushed forward into East Tennessee. All your scattered forces should be concentrated there. So long as we hold Tennessee, Kentucky is perfectly safe. Move down your infantry as rapidly as possible toward Chattanooga to connect with Rosecrans. Bragg may merely hold the passes of the mountains to cover Atlanta,and move his main army through Northern Alabama to reach the Tennessee River and turn Rosecrans' right and cut off his supplies. In this case he will turn Chattanooga over to you and move to intercept Bragg.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C., September 13, 1863-1 p.m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Chattanooga:

There is no intention of sending General Burnside into North Carolina. He is ordered to move down and connect with you. Should the enemy attempt to turn your right flank through Alabama,

Chattanooga should be turned over to Burnside, and your army, or such part of it as may not be required there, should move to prevent Bragg, from re-entering Middle Tennessee. Hurlbut will aid you all he can, but most of Grant's available force is west of the Mississippi.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.