War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0890 OPERATIONS IN N. C.,VA.,W. VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XLI.

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and secure all the rest of the articles named, and any others--such as shoes, horse-shoes, and horse-shoe mails--that you can get. While so engaged, I wish you to subsist the troops on those supplies that are most difficult of transportation, such as bacon, potatoes and other vegetables, which I hear can be had, sending back those that are easy to transport, such as cattle, particularly sheep and hogs. If you cannot get enough bacon and vegetables, you might use some of the sheep and hogs.

You will understand that these instructions have no application to those parts of the country that are accessible to our ordinary agents engaged in procuring supplies. You will make requisition on Major Bell for such transportation as he can furnish, and also try to get additional facilities from the people. The cloth, leather, and other quartermaster's stores should be collected as fully as possible, leaving, of course, enough for the wants of our people. Horses and cattle can be driven back at once. I write to Major Bell by this mail to assist you as far as he is able.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

P. S.--You will give out that your movement is intended as a military one against the enemy, and, of course, will do them all the harm you can. You will use all the troops, including those of Imboden and Gilmor, that you may require.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

December 22, 1863.

Major H. M. BELL,

Quartermaster of the Post, Staunton, Va.:

MAJOR: I have written to General Early to endeavor, while the troops are in the valley, to get all the supplies of cattle, horses, hogs, sheep, cloth, leather, and other quartermaster's stores from those parts of the country that are easily accessible to the enemy. I have directed him to call upon you for transportation, and desire you to furnish all you can, and aid him in getting any more he may require from the people. I wish you to render all the assistance in your power in this work; send your agents with the army, and wherever you can buy supplies belonging to your department--particularly horses, horse-shoes, cloth, and leather--do so, but where they cannot be bought they must be taken, giving certificates to the owners. The horses should be driven back as fast as they are procured. In taking any of the articles referred to, you will instruct your agents that while nothing must be left that can be made use of by the enemy, a sufficient supply for the necessities of the people must be course remain in their hands.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

P. S.--These instructions only apply to those portions of the country not accessible to our ordinary agents engaged in procuring supplies.