War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0803 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

the duty of brigade commander. The brigade never rendered more efficient service, or performed such prodigies of valor under any former commander, and at the same time exhibited the true characteristics of good patriots and true soldiers, a cheerful endurance of hardship, hunger, and fatigue.

I beg you to consider Captain W. K. Martin, assistant adjutant-general, as included in my commendation.

I have the honor to be, colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. B. STUART,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WESTERN VA. AND EAST TENN.,

Dublin, October 26, 1863.

Major General R. RANSOM, Jr.,

Commanding, &c., Abingdon:

The shoes are on the way; will be hurried forward as fast as possible. Press forward with the cavalry and two batteries, or more if you think proper, but press with the cavarly. If Williams asks for leave of absence give it to him, and give Brigadier General W. E. Jones charge of all the cavalry.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WESTERN VA. AND EAST TENN.,

Dublin, October 26, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Brigadier General John S. Williams desires to be transferred from this to some other department. He thinks, and under the circumstances I concur with him, that he can serve with more pleasure and satisfaction to himself and benefit to the cause in some other department than this. At the request of General Williams, I respectfully recommend and ask that when he makes his application to be transferred you will grant it.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WESTERN VA. AND EAST TENN.,

Dublin, October 26, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I telegraphed you a few days since suggesting that if, as reported, General Lee had driven General Meade to his intrenched camp at or near Centreville, and had fallen back himself behind the Rapphannock, a part of his infantry might be employed greatly to the interest of the service in East Tennessee at this time.

The cavalry I have will not, I am afraid, accompalish much unless well supported by infantry. I need not bring to your notice the importance of driving the enemy from East Tennessee. You know as well as I do not only the importance to us of that country from