War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0799 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDETATE.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S.,

Richmond, Va., October 22, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

Information has been received that a large number of women and children haev been landed at Suffolk, byt the Federal commander of that department, who are without transportation. Give an order to Major-General Pickett to afford all proper assistance to them to come into our lines, and for transportation to a reasonable distance. Lieutenant Foster may bear the order.

By order:

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Secretary of War.

ABINGDON, October 22, 1863.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Missionary Ridge, via Chickamauga:

Your telegram received. I will move on the enemy as soon as practicable, which will be in two or three days. Will inform you when I move.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

ABINGDON, October 22, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

I understand that General Meade has fallen back to his intrenched camp, and General Lee this side of the Rappahannock. If so, might not a few thousand of General Lee's infantry be sent here to aid in the effort to drive Burnside from East Tennessee? They are greatly needed.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

October 22, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN ECHOLS, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: The views expressed in your letter of yeasterday are in strict accordance with the wishes of the major-general commanding. The directions goven to Colonel McCausland were based upon the representation made in regard to the withdrawal of troops from the Kanawha, in consequence of which it was supposed he would be able to check such a move on the part of General Scammon as you suggest. The general commanding did not intend to designate the two points indicated for concentration in the way of an order, as he is too far off to know exactly the situation of affairs. Of course he expects you to exercise your best judgment and dispose your forces so as to best protect this line of railroad. Huntersville and Callaghan's were designated as the points which in his opinion were best for concentration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. S. STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.