War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0785 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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horse-shoes here and some that have been drawn from other points are on their way to you.

I have postpones some days my reply that I might learn the contents of a cargo just received at Wilmington. I am glad to say that some 10,500 pairs shoes and 6,500 blankets, besides a quantity of leather, are reported as received. These will relieve, I hope, your present necessities to a great extent, and the requisitions of Colonel Corley shall be filled as promptly as possible. In view of the exhausted condition of our resources here, I am using every effort to draw a winter's supply from abroad, and while the difficulties and uncertainties are such as to forbid my stating results in advance, I still hope to be able to provide, with economy, for the pressing wants of our armies in the field.

A. R. LAWTON,

Quartermaster-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Dublin, October 12, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN ECHOLS:

The major-general commanding directs me to say, in reply to your letter of the 10th instant, that he approves of your course and the suggestions contained in your letter of that date. He has been requested by General Lee to keep the enemy in his front occupied by an apparent if not a real move, that they may not send re-enforcements to any of the points against which our forces are now moving in the general plan adopted by the Government. He therefore directs you to advance your brigade in the direction of Gauley.

Should you have any opportunity of striking the enemy an effective blow, remove the blockade, push on, and attack him with vigor. If, however, you are satisfied from the information you obtain that no blow can be struck at the enemy with advantage at Bowyer's Ferry or elsewhere, you will simply make such a demonstration as will occupy his attention and prevent his sending troops elsewhere. A regiment of cavalry may be sent to scout in the direction of Summerville.

Colonel Ferguson will be directed to co-operate with you, and be under your orders, for the purposes herein indicated.

I am, general, very respectfully,

CHAS. S. STRINGFELLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Dublin, October 12, 1863.

Colonel M. J. FERGUSON,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

COLONEL: Directions have been given General Echols in regard to the purposes and objects of a contempleted move in the direction of Gauley. As the general commanding desires you to co-operate with General Echols, he directs you to report to him at once, and act under his orders, for the object of the movement above referred to.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. S. STRONGFELLOW.

50 R R - VOL XXIX, PT II