War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0693 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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He wishes you to do all in your power to collect together your command, which he leans has a large amount of stragglers from your old camp, as far as Millbouough. Communicate with the general at Dublin Depot.

Very respectfully,

WM. B. MYERS,

ASssistant Adjutant- General.

UNION,

September 1, 1863.

Colonel JOHN MCCAUSLAND,

Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: The major- general commanding desires you to advise yourself fully of the movements of the enemy in the Kanawha Valley; any chnge in their force, their numbers, stations, &c. He wishes this done through scouts, and any information which you acquire please forward to the major- general commanding, at the Narrows, by letter.

He also desires to know where your cavalry now is.

Very respectfully,

WM. B. MYERS,

Assistant Adjutant- General.

RED SWEET SPRINGS,

September 1, 1863.

Colonel GEORGE S. PATTON,

Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: AThe major- general desireds that you communicate with him at Dublin by way of Union until further instructions. He wishes you to scout to Gauley, and send some reliable men to the Kanawha Valley, as he is anxious to learn, as soon as possible, any information of the forces, &c., in that locality.

Will you please send a courier up the Antony's Creek road to a Mr. Hall's, 5 miles above Dolan's, and direct him to bring a wagon left there by our temaster on the march. The horse had best be turned over to the quartermaster at Lewisburg.

Respectfully,

WM. B. MYERS,

Assistant Adjutant- General.

HEADQUARTERS,

September 2, 1863.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 31st is received. I have esxprssed to Generals Ewell and Hill your wishes,a nd am doing all that can be done to be well prepared with my own commadn. Our greatest difficulty will be in preparing our animals. I do not know that we can reasonbly hope to acomplish much heree by offensive operations, unless you are strong enough to cross the Potomac. If we advance to meet the enemy on this side, he will, in all probability, go into one of his many fortified positions; these we cannot afford to attack.