War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0677 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- CONFEDERATE.

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BOTTOM'S BRIDGE, August 27, 1863.

Major- General ELZEY, Richmond, Va.:

A courier has just arrived with intelligence that the enemy is coming up in force, both infantry and cavalry. The advance guard was at Barhmsville this morning. Six flags seen in the infantry.

J. G. McKISSICK,

Captain, Commanding Cavalry, Holcombe Legion.

Mr. Kendrick will send the above dispatch to Geneal Elzey forth- with, and oblige, very respectfully,

J. G. McKISSICK,

Captain, Commanding, &c.

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, August 27, 1863.

Brigadier- General IMBODEN, Commanding, &c.:

We fought the enemy near here all yesterday and to- day again. About midday they retreated toward Warm Springs. They suffered severely her, and are much exhausted, both men and horses, and I believe they are short of ammunition. I have ordered Wharton's and Jackson's brigades to hurry to Warm Spings and attack them. Look out for them and damage them as much as possible.

SAM. JONES,

Major- General.

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS,

August 27, 1863.

Commanding Officer Jenkins' Brigade:

Press forward as rapidlly as possible to Warm Springs, and attack the enemy. He was whipped and punished severely here yesterday, and to- day retreated toward Warm Springs about midday, men and horses much exhausted; cavalry and infantry pursuing them. Colonels Wharton and Jackson are ordered to Warm Springs on same duty I now order you.

SAM. JONES,

Major- General.

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS,

August 27, 1863.

Colonel W. L. JACKSON, Commanding, &c.:

Fought the enemy near here all day yesterday, and again to- day, until about midday, when he abandoned his position, and retreated toward Warm Springs, pursued by cavalry and artillery. They have about 3,000 men and six field pieces, under General Averell. They left one regiment at Warm Springs. I hope you and Jenkins' brigade will intecept the retreating enemy at Warm Springs, and folow and cut them up. They suffered severely here. One of their surgeons, whom we have, estimates their loss at 500. We have taken about 150 prisoners. They are much exhausted, both men and horses, and I believe they are short of ammunition. Push them to the utmost, and help destroy them, if possible.

SAM. JONES,

Major- General.