War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0635 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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I respectfully ask that you will inform me how the reports of these irregularities and abuses in my command reached you, and from whom you obedient the information, that I may trace up and correct all such irregularities and abuses.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

As general Jones appears to be indisposed to sent out the companies referred to for the important object contemplated, it is acarcely necessary to pursue the subject further in respect to his command.

FORT BOYKIN,

August 10, 1863.

[Major JAS. F. MILLIGAN:]

Our scout from Norfolk could not get any reliable information about the Yankees' intention to evacuate Norfolk.

They have one regiment at Deep Creek, and that place is well fortified. One regiment of infantry and one of cavalry (Eleventh Pennsylvania) at Oak Grove, 1 mile from Portsmouth. One regiment at Norfolk. The whole amount of forces at and around the cities is estimated at 4,000.

He saw the steamer that was fired into by our forces up the James River the other day. She was badly crippled-four shots into her, besided many bullets also.

A torpedo exploded while one of the gunboats was very near it, and the concussion of the water threw 14 men overboard, 3 of whom were drowned. One of the gunboats came to her assistance, and the captain of the first gunboat, thinking his boat was sinking,and in the attempt to jump on the steamer coming to his assistance, was struck by a cannon ball from the shore and cut in two. This is Yankee news.

A regiment of 1,300 negroes left Fort Monroe for Charleston, August 8. Small-pox is said to be bad among the negroes at Norfolk. One English man-of-war and one Yankee are all the shipping at Fort Monroe. They are trying to raise the Cumberland.

Yours, respectfully, &c.,

JOS. R. WOODLEY,

Lieutenant, Commanding.

ENGINEER BUREAU,

August 10, 1863.

His Excellency ZEBULON B. VANCE,

Governor of North Carolina, Raligh, N. C.:

SIR: For completing the defenses of Wilmington at an early day, slave labor is required, and Major-Generral Whiting, commanding in the eastern part of your State, urges that immediate steps be taken to procure it. The works ought to be pressed forward without delay, and to this end I am instructed by the honorable Secretary of War