War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0468 OPERATIONS IN N. C.,VA.,W. VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XLI.

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very angry, and it results from this that the line of pickets is constantly threatened both in front and rear, and its maintenance will occasion the loss of men, as in this instance.

D. MCM. GREGG,

Brigadier General of Vols., Commanding Second Division.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., November 16, 1863.

Ordered: Messrs. James C. Wetmere, of Ohio; Gardiner Tufts, of Massachusetts; W. Y. Selleck, of Wisconsin; A. Chester, of Illinois, and J. C. Rafferty, of New Jersey, are hereby constituted a Board of Inspectors, whose duty it shall be to inspect from time to time the Government general hospitals and military prisons in the Department of Washington, under such special instructions as shall be given by the War Department.

All officers of these hospitals and prisons are enjoined to treat the inspectors herein named with respect and courtesy.

The Quartermaster's Department will furnish such transportation as may be necessary for the Board to perform the duty of visiting the hospitals and prisons.

By order of the Secretary of War:

JAS. A. HARDIE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, November 16, 1863.

JAMES C. WESTMORE, of Ohio; GARDINER TUFTS, of Massachusetts; W. Y. SELLECK, of Wisconsin; a. CHESTER, of Illinois; J. C. RAFFERTY, of New Jersey:

GENTLEMEN: As a Board of Inspectors for the Government general hospitals and military prisons in the Department of Washington, I am directed to convey to you the following instructions for your guidance:

AS HOSPITAL INSPECTORS.

1. The inspectors are required to inspect the hospitals as to their general order and cleanliness in all their parts and premises.

2. To observe as to the efficiency, faithfulness, and humanity of the surgeons and other attendants.

3. To inspect particularly the management of the kitchens, the condition of shores and supplies, both as to food and clothing, the nature of the cooking, the quantity and quality of the rations, and, in general, everything pertaining to the sanitary condition of the patients.

4. To receive complaints of patients as to grievances, and give them a reasonable hearing and investigation, yet in no way to interfere with the military discipline of the hospital. If any just ground for complaint be found, or any reform be needed, they are to apply for the remedy to the surgeon in charge. If that does not accomplish the end, they are to report the facts directly to the Secretary of War, and, generally, they are to report to him whenever in their judgment