War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0397 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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apply. Such acts as are complained of are deeply regretted, and every effort is made to prevent them. Nevertheless such things always have and probably always will occur in a border war.

Most of these difficulties are caused by the conduct of the pretended non-combatant inhabitants of the country. They pretend to act the part of neutrals, but do not. They give aid, shelter, and concealment to guerrilla and robber bands like that of Mosby, who are continually destroying our roads, burning our bridges, and capturing wagon trains. If these men carried on a legitimate warfare no complaint would be made. On the contrary, they fight in citizens' dress and are aided in all their rascalities by the people of the country. As soon as they are likely to be caught, they go home, but out their horses, hide their arms, and pretend to be quiet and non-combatant farmers. This thing has often been repeated by your brothers neighbors and, it is alleged, by members of his family. It is not surprising that our people get exasperated at such men and shoot them down when they can. Moreover, men who act in this manner in disguise, and within our lines, have, under the laws of civilized war, forfeited their lives.

Very truly, yours,

H. W. HALLECK.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 350.

Washington, October 28, 1863.

I. By direction of the President of the United States, Major General B. F. Butler, U. S. Volunteers, is appointed to the command of the Eighteenth Army Corps and of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. Major General J. G. Foster, on being relieved by General Butler, will report in person for orders to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

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By order of the Secretary of War:

E. T. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

OCTOBER 29, 1863-10 p. m.

Commanding Officer Third Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that to-morrow you take position in front of Warreton Junction, on the south side of the railroad on the heights of Licking Run, your rights resting on or near the railroad. The teams of the corps now with the constructions party can be withdrawn for the purpose of this movement. Have a brigade at Catlett's Station to guard the depot and bridge over Cedar Run, and the railroad to the junction.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 29, 1863.

Major-General FRENCH:

General headquarters will move to-morrow at 10 a. m. to the vicinity of Colonel Murray's, near Three-Mile Station, Warrenton Branch