War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0385 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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destroy the railroad bridge across New River. But as General Echols was at Greenbrier and General Jenkins at Union, each with quite a force, I deemed it not advisable to move until I had force sufficient to drive both of them out. I have, unfortunately, been delayed in getting my force in condition to move for want of horses, arms, &c.

My proposed plan is to send General Averell, now at Beverly, with three regiments of cavalry and mounted infantry, one regiment of infantry, and a battery, via Huntersville, and General Duffie, with two regiments of cavalry, two regiments of infantry, and a battery from the mouth of Gauley, on the Kanawha, and from a junction at or near Lewisburg. After disposing of Echols, for the cavalry to proceed on through Union to destination, unless such information is acquired at Lewisburg of the strength of the enemy at Union or the railroad, as would make the expedition too hazardous.

Averell is about ready, and Duffie will be in a very few days. The expedition will move as soon as possible, as proposed, unless you deem it best to order otherwise.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

October 26, 1863-11. 30 a. m.

Colonel C. ROSS SMITH,

Chief of Staff.

COLONEL: The general directs me to say that the enemy advanced on our pickets this morning and have driven them up back beyond Bealeton Station. Have not yet ascertained their numbers. They have infantry.

By command of Brigadier-General Buford:

A. P. MORROW,

Lieutenant, and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

October 26, 1863.

Major-General PLEASONTON,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

I drove the enemy back to near Bealeton, where they came upon me too strong, with infantry and artillery, and I am falling back to Colonel Smith's infantry brigade, which is half way between Bealeton and Germantown.

Respectfully,

JNO. BUFORD,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

BRISTOE,

October 26, 1863.

General S. WILLIAMS:

Artillery firing pretty frequent when I sent my dispatch. It has now ceased. It lasted about an hour and was very distinct, although the wind is not favorable for my hearing. It appeared by map and

25 R R-VOL XXIX, PT II