War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0382 OPERATIONS IN N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLI.

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OCTOBER 25, 1863-3. 15 p. m.

Commanding Officer Third Corps:

I am instructed to say that the movement of the enemy to Kelly's Ford, in connection with the disposition of his force at and near Rappahannock Station, may mean an intention on his part to advance by the line of the railroad and by the route from Kelly's Ford through Bristersburg, crossing Cedar Run at Weaverville and about 2 miles farther down near the house marked "Foulk" on the map. The ground from Catlett's house and vicinity to Weaverville, and along Cedar Run to Foulk's, and that vicinity, should be carefully examined to ascertain what advantages it possesses for posting the troops in such event as that indicated. General Sykes is now at Auburn, and his corps and other would, under the circumstances indicated, be directed toward the general position just pointed out.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, and Chief of Staff.

MITCHELL'S,

[October] 25, 1863-6. 15 p. m.

Captain NORTON:

Rebel message:

General L.:

I have ordered Chambiliss' brigade to Germanna. I will be up to see you.

FITZ. LEE.

WM. H. R. NEEL,

Lieutenant, and Signal Officer.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 25, 1863.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I inclose two reports, one from General Buford, * representing the condition of the cavalry horses in the First Division, and one from General Gregg,* on the same subject, in regard to the Second Division of this corps. General Kilpatrick has not yet sent in his report of the Third Division. I have asked for it,and shall forward it as soon as received. From a conversation with General Kilpatrick yesterday, I am enabled to state to you the condition of his command. He can mount about 2,000 men, but his horses are not fit for hard service, and the disease called "rotten hoof" has made its appearance in that division with great virulence. The Reserve Brigade, under General Merritt, is about 1,600 strong. I am informed they have already sent back several hundred horses to Washington as unfit for service. That brigade only joined from depot about a week ago.

In case the major-general commanding requires any very hard service of the cavalry in a short time, I would respectfully suggest

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*See p. 400.

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