War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0363 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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We are also endeavoring in every practicable form to obtain information regarding any movements that threaten us, so that we may secure any machinery or property that may be endangered. If the forces that can be concentrated near the Baltimore and Ohio line are active and sufficient to endanger Stuart's return, I strongly hope that he will be deterred from attempting a raid into Maryland and Pennsylvania.

J. W. GARRETT,

President.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,

October 21, 1863.

Captain POTTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to state that the party of cavalry sent out from here in search of rebel cavalry have returned, who report that the number of the enemy supposed to be in the vicinity of Chichester Mills was greatly exaggerated. Colonel Lowell, in conjunction with Colonel Baker, is still scouring the country.

MICHAEL CORCORAN,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST SEPARATE BRIGADE,

Beverly, October 21, 1863.

Brigadier-General AVERELL,

Clarksburg:

Six of our scouts just in from the front. They were 5 miles beyond Big Spring. Report Captain McNeill's cavalry company at Huntersville, parts of Hutton's and Marshall's companies on Elk Mountain, near Edray; about 100 infantry at Greenbrier Bridge. Colonel Arnett commands all these forces. Headquarters at Greenbrier Bridge. No forces at Green Bank or Dunmore. The force in all that country not over 300.

They also report that they were told by one Sharp, a very reliable Union man living beyond Big Spring, that an officer of Jackson's command told him about a week ago that the forces of Jones and Jenkins were en route to the Kanawha Valley, and that Jackson would endeavor to capture Bulltown, and then join forces near Charleston. Nothing known of Jackson since his repulse.

L. MARKBREIT,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, October 21, 1863-2. 45 p. m.

Major-General SCHENCK,

Baltimore, Md.:

A delegation is here saying that our armed colored troops are at many, if not all, the landings on the Patuxent River, and by their presence with arms in their hands are frightening quiet people, and producing great confusion. Have they been sent there by any order; and if so, for what reason?

A. LINCOLN.