War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0329 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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our right. I believe we can whip him in any fair fight, even by attacking.

If you wish, I can push forward again and see what is going on in my front, if you are still in doubt about the enemy's movements.

I am very tired, or I would come down to see you.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN.

[P. S.]-The officers of the corps are very much delighted with your compliment, and I am more than pleased-am very grateful.

SIGNAL STATION, GENERAL WARREN'S HEADQUARTERS, October 15, 1863-9. 25 p. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

The enemy, I believe, had a thin picket line at dark along Bull Run. We could see a little force at Manassas, but could not say how much. I think there is no considerable force in my front.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, October 15, 1863. (Received 6. 30 a. m., 16th.)

Major-General FRENCH,

Union Mills:

Buford reports he still needs assistance. Send a brigade at early daylight. Wolf Run Ford is on Bull Run, 1 1/4 miles below Union Mills. It is laid down on the McDowell map.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

NEW YORK, October 15, 1863. (Received 3. 40 p. m.)

Colonel J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The Fifth Wisconsin will leave for Washington this afternoon. Shall I arm the new organizations coming in from the interior of the State? It will perhaps save time to send them on direct.

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C., October 15, 1863-6. 20 p. m.

General CANBY,

New York City:

I think all troops from the interior should be sent on direct.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.