War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0253 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON,

October 4, 1863.

[Colonel J. C. KELTON,]

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. of the Army:

COLONEL: In reply to indorsed communication of Colonel D. C. McCallum, Superintendent Military Railroads, with reference to exposed condition of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad and the absence of guards at the bridges, received at these headquarters October 2, I have the honor to state that the length of railroad from Alexandria to Bull Run is 23 miles.

On this line there are 6 stations, 3 water-tanks, and 10 principal bridges, exclusive of that over Bull Run. Eighteen miles of the line are guarded by the command of Brigadier General Rufus King, who has an effective force of 1,362 enlisted infantry. The remaining 5 miles are guarded by the command of Brigadier-General Slough, who has an effective force of 867 enlisted infantry.

In addition to guarding the railroad proper, Brigadier-General King is compelled to hold Fairfax Court-House, and furnish the necessary pickets and picket guards for his camp, and until recently has kept a long line of pickets in front of Centreville. Brigadier-General Slough occupies the town of Alexandria, furnishing the necessary city guards and patrols.

Colonel McCallum submits the following statement:

OFFICE MIL. DIRECTOR AND SUPT. OF RAILROADS,

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 2, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following statement:

A bridge was burned by the enemy at Edsall's, 5 miles west of Alexandria, about September 8. Bridge was burned at Pope's Head, Numbers 1, about September 27. This is 1 1/2 miles west of Fairfax. Cameron Run bridge was burned September 30; located 3 miles from Alexandria. Raid near Burke's, September 24, capturing 8 mules. Raid near Burke's, October 1. Raid near Springfield, October 1, capturing 3 trackmen.

Our bridges are constantly exposed; so far as my knowledge extends, none of them are guarded.

I would respectfully suggest that the troops now at Warrenton Junction be changed so as to camp in the woods west of the station, and thus protect the water-tanks and wood-choppers at the same time.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. McCALLUM,

Colonel, and Military Director and Superintendent of Railroads.

The facts are these, taking the attacks in the order named.

First:

A bridge was burned by the enemy at Edsall's, 5 miles west of Alexandria, about September 8.

The bridge was fired as the last train was coming over empty, it is supposed by persons from Alexandria, as they evidently did not know the train time. Trackmen discovered the fire and extinguished it before any damage was done.

Second:

Bridge was burned at Pope's Head, Numbers 1., about September 27. this is 1 1/2 miles west of Fairfax.

The bridge was fired by 27 of White's men; the fire was discovered by patrol, extinguished, and reported to Colonel Lowell, Second