War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0153 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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SEPTEMBER 3, 1863-12. 30 p. m.

Circular to Corps Commanders:

The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that the expedition sent from the left flank of this army has returned, after having successfully accomplished its object, by destroying the two gunboats recently captured from us off the mouth of the Rappahannock.

I am instructed to say that although the particular contingency under which the troops were recently ordered to be held in readiness to move at short notice is not likely now to occur, yet the necessity for such movements may arise at any moment, and corps commanders are expected to hold their troops prepared to move at brief notice.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

FORT MONROE, VA., September 3, 1863-11 p. m.

(Received 11. 45 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

I propose to go to New Berne to-morrow upon urgent business connected with the contraband colony. I start in the Spaulding in the evening, unless you do not desire me to go. I propose to send the Spaulding directly on to Charleston, with some ammunition for the navy that is waiting shipment here, and to have her bring back the latest news. From Mr. Fulton's statement I infer that something interesting will shortly occur in that quarter. Have you a desire to go down there? If so, this will be the fairest opportunity, as the Spaulding is a safe and swift steamer.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

September 4, 1863-1. 24 p. m.

Major-General FOSTER,

Fort Monroe, Va.:

You will exercise your own judgment in regard to visiting other parts of your department. Information received here indicates that Lee's army will soon move. It is not possible for me at present to go to Charleston.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CLARKSBURG, W. VA., September 4, 1863.

(Received 5. 30 p. m.)

Brigadier-General CULLUM,

Chief of Staff:

Nothing new in my department. All quiet, except we are annoyed in some counties with bushwhackers and horse-thieves. I keep scouts constantly after them.

General Averell is at Beverly, resting his command, shoeing horses, and getting up supplies and ammunition. I am now satisfied