War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0149 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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killed him almost instantly (July 2, 1863). This young officer, for his grade, had no superior in the army.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. SYKES,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF ENGINEER OF DEFENSES,

Washington, September 1, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: The works of Rozier's Bluff, and near Jones' Point are nearly ready to receive guns-in fact they could have been mounted some time ago, had the guns and platforms been available. You are well aware that not only are the large seaport towns, like New York, Boston, and Philadelphia making strenuous exertions to increase their armament of improved guns, but even places of a (comparatively) secondary importance, like Portland, &c. If we have war with a maritime power (a possibility which incites all these preparations), the land defenses of Washington will prove unavailing unless also the access by water is prevented.

There is not now a gun mounted for the defense of the Potomac capable of having the slightest effect upon an iron-clad vessel. As it seems to devolve upon me to represent the necessities of Washington, I would recommend that among the guns which actually do become available, a fair proportion should be assigned to Washington.

The Ordnance Department is doing all that can be done to furnish guns. It has no voice, however, in their distribution, and as there are no Governors of States, or commissions of citizens to advocate the needs of Washington, I feel called on to make this representation.

I am, very respectfully, your most obedient,

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General, and Chief Engineer of Defenses.

CLARKSBURG, September 1, 1863.

Brigadier-General AVERELL,

Beverly:

I am not prepared to answer your question definitely. I can see no reason, however, why you should not make the exchange proposed. Send medicine, &c. General Jones' report of your affair appears in Baltimore American to-day; he reports his los at 200 killed and wounded. I will send you the paper.

[B. F. KELLEY],

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH SEPARATE BRIGADE,

Beverly, September [1], 1863.

Brigadier General B. F. KELLEY,

Clarksburg:

The exchange could not be effected without further orders from General Jones. The information received is that they had 2,500 in