War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0077 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. -UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

report is not true. The mysterious firing reported as having been heard was probably the cavalry at the mouth of Elk Run discharging their pieces.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, TWELFTH ARMY CORPS, Near Ellis' Ford, Va., August 20, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel H. C. RODGERS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Twelfth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to inform the general commanding corps that the general line of pickets perpendicular to the river has been disturbed by the Second Corps pickets having been withdrawn, leaving a space of about 4 miles open between my left and the right of the Second Corps, through which a body of men could pass between here and Morrisville and toward your headquarters without encountering a picket line.

My command is now drafted upon to its utmost capacity in maintaining 7 miles of pickets on the river, and from thence to Crittenden's Mill, 2 miles farther. From the latter place our line was before connected with that of the Second Corps, but owing to the change the long, broken line leaves unguarded the left flank of the army. I deem it my duty to inform you of this change, feeling cognizant of the precarious condition our flank is placed in by leaving unguarded the line perpendicular to the river northeast of Crittenden's Mill.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. W. GEARY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, TWELFTH ARMY CORPS, Near Ellis' Ford, Va., August 20, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel H. C. RODGERS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Twelfth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have this day received information from Aldie (through a source which has always proved reliable and which has served me upon many occasions during the war), that I deem sufficiently important to communicate to the general commanding corps.

My informant states that the rebel citizens in and about Aldie have become exceedingly jubilant within a few days past over a prospect of Lee's army advancing, which is looked for by them daily. They state they have been informed by relatives in the rebel army that Lee, greatly strengthened, intends making a diversion in our front, and under its cover of advancing in two columns, one on our right and one on the left of our lines, one of which will be as a decoy. They suppose the feint will be made on our right flank, while the advance will be made by way of Dumfries toward Washington.