War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0049 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 1.

New Berne, N. C., August 14, 1863.

In accordance with orders from headquarters Department of Virginia and North Carolina, the undersigned assumes command of the Eighteenth Army Corps. All existing orders and regulations will remain in force until modified or revoked.

The following officers are announced upon the staff of the major-general commanding:

Major Benjamin B. Foster, assistant adjutant-general.

Surg. Daniel W. Hand, medical director.

Lieutenant Colonel Francis Darr, chief commissary of subsistence.

Captain R. C. Webster, chief quartermaster.

Lieutenant Charles R. Stirling, aide-de-camp.

Lieutenant James D. Outwater, aide-de-camp.

The remainder of the staff will be announced in future orders.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY, ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 361.

Washington, August 14, 1863.

* * * *

V. Brigadier General A. N. Duffie, U. S. Volunteers, will report in person without delay for duty to Brigadier General B. F. Kelley, U. S. Volunteers,

commanding, &c., West Virginia.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assitant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 15, 1863-10. 30 a. m.

Commanding Officer First Corps:

I am directed by the major-general commanding to inform you that information derived from scouts and other sources indicates a concentration of the enemy in the vicinity of the United States Ford. The purpose may be to turn the left of this army, or a cavalry raid only may be contemplated. To meet either of these projects, the cavalry has been concentrated, leaving a picket force only in your front.

The major-general commanding instructs me to say that his operations for the present will be defensive. Should either a raid or movement to turn the flank of the army be commenced, it will undoubtedly be accompanied by a demonstration upon that part of the river held by your corps. In the disposition of your force, that portion on the south bank of the river is to be regarded as subsidiary to or forming a subordinate part of the main defense which is to be made from this side of the river. You will, therefore hold in view the necessity that may occur of your being forced to withdraw the troops on the south side to the north side of the river, and eventually of abandoning the line of the Rappahannock.

4 R R-VOL XXIX, PT II