War of the Rebellion: Serial 049 Page 0035 Chapter XLI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WASHINGTON,

August 12, 1863-9 p. m.

General GEORGE G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

If you can conveniently leave your command, I would be glad to see you at the Department to-morrow, or at your earliest convenience, for the purpose of consultation. Please report whether you can come and when.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, Numbers 25.

August 12, 1863.

By direction of the major-general commanding Army of the Potomac, the Second Brigade of the Second Cavalry Division is hereby broken up, and will be distributed as follows:

Second New York Cavalry to the First Brigade, Third Division.

Fourth New York Cavalry to the Second Brigade, First Division.

The First Rhode Island, Sixth Ohio, and Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry will be assigned by the division commander of the Second Division to the two brigades of that command, to equalize their numbers as much as possible.

By command of Major-General Pleasonton:

A. J. COHEN.

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

New Berne, N. C., August 12, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

COLONEL: I have the honor to inclose the communication in reference to the property stolen from Washington by various officers. The letter from Lieutenant-Colonel McChesney throws some light on the matter. Some of the things not enumerated by Colonel McChesney were doubtless taken without authority, but the precise amount cannot be ascertained. I inclose, also, copies of orders issued here since General Foster left this corps. With regard to the funds captured on the late raid, and placed in the hands of Lieutenant Cardner, I can only say that the whole matter was conducted in a very irregular manner. You inform me that this money ($2,600) had been turned over by Lieutenant Cardner to Colonel Lewis, who was to turn it over to General Potter. Why, then, did not Colonel Lewis do so? He was here for several days with General Potter, and as soon as General Potter left, he (Colonel Lewis) applied for and received a leave of absence to go direct to New York, taking the money with him. Besides, I think that the $2,600 was only a small portion of the amount of money captured. I think I can show that Lieutenant Cardner sold a considerable sum of money, either North Carolina State or Confederate money-as much as $1,100 to one person-all of which was money captured on that raid. The matter is in the hands of the provost-marshal, who, will, I hope, be able to throw more light on this matter.