War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0594 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., December 30, 1863-12 m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Enemy's fire on Sumter has ceased again for present. Three additional heavy guns will soon be remounted in fort. The city is shelled occasionally, with little effect. Expedition has not succeeded in recovering two siege howitzers left (horses being disabled), morning 25th instant, in masked battery on James Island, near Legareville. Enemy had destroyed carriages and carried off pieces.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C., December 30, 1863-1.15 p. m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Enemy dragged yesterday the channel abreast of Wagner with two barges, probably for the sunken Weekawken.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

RICHMOND, December 30, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

DEAR GENERAL: Inclosed I send you you a letter from Mr. Mallory, to whom I submitted your notes.*

The press of other matter sand the accumulation of papers made me lose sight of it for some little time, as you will see by its date. I suppose you will not be very much surprised at its contents.

There is nothing new of interest which I am yet at liberty to communicate. This sound mysterious, but I cannot say more except that it relates to foreign affairs. It may come to nothing, or may lead to advantageous results if dexterously and judiciously handled. Meanwhile, we are trying to strengthen our army and render our military system more efficient. But there is so much demagogism that I sometimes feel very despondent. Can you not state, with some official certainly, that the enemy are considerably increasing their strength in the vicinity of Port Royal, and upon that information ask for some of Longstreet's troops?

The probability is that he will winter where he is, for the purpose of subsisting his army. In that event, might not Jenkinks and Kershaw be specially asked for by you, if there is a strong probability that the enemy intend an attack in force upon the Charleston and Savannah Railroad? I do not know whether Jenkins, who is very ambitious, would like to abandon a major-general's command (which he now enjoys), but Kershaw would like to recruit his brigade in South Carolina. It is reduced to some 1,500 men, but might be largely filled up with conscripts, and men from regiments now on the coast which have over the maximum allowed by law. This latter fact, by the way, gives no little dissatisfaction to the decimated regi-

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*Probably those of November 14, p. 503.

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