War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0526 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

Search Civil War Official Records

IMPRESSED FOR VOLUNTEERED.

July..................................................... 1,600

August................................................... 140

September................................................ 750

October.................................................. 600

November................................................. 60

-----

Total.................................................... 3,150

There are now at work on the fortifications 4,041 negroes, of which number 662 were either impressed or were volunteers, and 3,379 received by regular call. Two thousand two hundred and eleven, in consequence of sixty days' service, are entitled to discharge.

I respectfully ask whether it is the intention of the commanding general to retain these negroes for a longer period, or to discharge them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. ECHOLS,

Major, and Chief Engineer, South Carolina.

[Indorsement.]

OFFICE CHIEF ENGINEER,

Charleston, November 25, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded, for the information of the commanding general.

If more energy is not infused into the system of impressment, it will be necessary, in order to keep the working force up to 3,500 effective hands, to retain the negroes now here, even beyond the sixty days recently ordered. Most of these negroes are thinly clad, and it is of importance they should be relieved by vigorous impressment, as the State authorities fail to supply the requisitions made them of monthly reliefs of 2,500 hands.

D. B. HARRIS,

Colonel, and Chief Engineers.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH MILITARY DISTRICT, S. C.,

Georgetown., November 26, 1863.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I have to modify somewhat my report concerning the ports in this military district which may be used by steamers of light draught for running the blockade. For example, I reported that any vessels crossing the Santee Bars could proceed directly to the Northeastern Railroad where it crosses the river, and discharge their cargoes. But, upon further inquiry, I am informed that at the ordinary stages of the river this could not be done. In times of freshest it can. There is a difference of opinion, too, in reference to the water at South Santee entrance. Some persons say there is less, rather, than at North Santee.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.