War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0462 S.C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E.FLA. Chapter XL.

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growing sugar-cane, and it is estimated that these sections will produce this year about 700,000 pounds of sugar, besides large quantities of syrup and molasses, all of which could be made available for the subsistence of this army.

I would respectfully call your attention to the fact that speculators are buying up hides and tallow in Florida, and giving more for them than officers in this department are allowed to give for the whole beef; consequently, the cattle-owners are loath to sell their stock to the district commissaries.

The only practicable remedy for the evil that can be promptly applied is to call in the assistance of officers of the quartermaster's department, and I respectfully suggest that you bring the matter to the attention of the commanding general, and request that the officers of that department in the State of Florida be ordered to seize all hides and tallow found in the hands of specular.

This will not only remove one of the difficulties in the way of commissaries purchasing, but would put a stop to the slaughtering of beeves for the hide and tallow.

Of the distillation of sugar and molasses, I have already advised you, in my communication from Quincy, and need not again mention it.

I cannot close this report without informing you that I received every possible assistance in the discharge of my duties from Major White and his subordinate officers, during my stay in the State, and that in all of them I found the greatest willingness to do all in their power to assist in subordinate officers, during my stay in the State, and that in all of them I found the greatest willingness to do all in their power to assist in subsisting the army of General Beauregard.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

C. McCLENAGHAN,

Major, and Commissary of Subsistence.

[Indorsement.]

OFFICE CHIEF COMMISSARY, Charleston, S. C., October 30, 1863.

Respectfully referred to the commanding general, for his information; and his attention is particularly called to the very great importance of completing the link oaf railroad referred to.

H. C. GUERIN,

Major, and Commissary of Subsistence.

CHARLESTON, S. C., October 30, 1863-7 a. m.

General S. COOPER:

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Bombardment of Sumter from enemy's land and naval batteries has been incessant, night and day,since yesterday's report.

Casualties very few in Sumter. Ironsides has not fired one shot since attack upon her by cigar torpedo-boat David.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

RICHMOND, October 30, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Charleston, S. C.:

I am directed to answer your dispatch--that of October 29-as follows: Your return of October 20, shows effective total of your