War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0416 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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to see if these guns might not be, if not as good as new, at least deserving of over 200 rounds apiece of good rifled projectiles, and which are so valuable, now that we have rifled batteries in depot, doing no service, with men and transportation for them, and all because, as officially stated, we cannot put aside the work going on at our shops and arsenals for the making of projectiles for them.

Rifled guns are wanted on new lines as well as smooth-bores.

AMBROSIO JOSE GONZALES,

Colonel, and Chief of Artillery, Commanding Art. on James Island.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., September 18, 1863.

List of guns on James Island for distribution recommended to be rifled and banded by Board of Officers called together by Paragraph VI, Special Orders, Numbers 179, dated September 10, 1863, to determine the armament of the new lines on James Island, the works on the Upper StoNumbers

No. Caliber. Position. Remarks.

1 12-pounder. Battery Numbers To be banded.

1.

1 18-pounder. Battery Numbers To be rifled and

3. banded.

2 24-pounders. Fort Lamar. Now in position, and

recommended to

remain. To be banded.

1 18-pounder. Battery Wilkes. To be rifled and

banded.

2 24-pounders. Battery Haig. To be banded.

1 12-pounder. Battery Palmer. Do.

2 32-pounders. Battery Numbers To be rifled and

2. banded.

2 32-pounders. Battery Numbers Do.

4.

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

October 13, 1863.

Brigadier General H. W. MERCER,

Savannah, Ga.:

District troops are intended also for defense of department, and those of department for defense of Confederacy. Circumstances control where they shall be located and by whom commanded.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

October 14, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I am now able, fully and satisfactorily, to comply with your request to make inquiries as to what Virginia troops have been sent here which had to be supplied with arms. I went yesterday to General Beauregard, in person, and asked whether Brigadier-General Ripley had made any representations to the War Department indorsed by him, General Beauregard, in respect to furnishing my brigade with arms. He replied that he had not; that General Ripley had nothing to do with my command, being my junior in rank; that it was Anderson's brigade which had been assigned to Ripley's sub-division of command, which was referred to. I went then to the office of his assistant adjutant-general; saw the indorsement and