War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0391 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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motive power to maneuver with safety in the presence of the enemy. For this reason the naval guns have not been brought into action yet, although the siege has been in progress since the 10th of July, say eighty-six days.

We have been able already to provide good batteries for all the army guns furnished us up to this time, inclosing the many fine pieces it was thought best to the move from Fort Sumter. Effective and well-protected positions can be rapidly prepared for at least the five additional naval guns it is earnestly desire to mount on shore. In fact, preparations have been made, in anticipation, for three of the five, under the hope that additional guns would be obtained from some source to supply the armament.

I am so confident that the transfer now recommended will add so materially to the strength of our defenses, that I feel it a duty to urge it upon the Government, and to ask prompt action in the case.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. GILMER,

Major-General.

CHARLESTON,

October 5, 1863-7.30 a. m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

Nothing worth recording since last report. If a small-arms called for by my chief of ordnance cannot be had, will have to disband several six-months' regiments lately called out. They consume provisions uselessly.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

[Indorsement.]

ORDNANCE BUREAU, October 5, 1863.

Respectfully returned to the Adjutant and Inspector General.

One thousand rifles, caliber .54, were sent to Colonel Waddy from Augusta, September 19, and on the 26th ultimo, 888 stand were delivered to Captain C. C. Pinckney, ordnance officer First Military District, as shown by statements on file in this office, from Charleston Arsenal.

The Austrian rifles received from abroad required cleaning, but have been delivered to troops as fast as called for.

J. GORGAS,

Colonel, and Chief of Ordnance.

[P. S.].-Besides the 1,000 arms referred to above, 2,367 were sent from Wilmington to Charleston; 888 (as above) have been repaired and issued, and the remainder are in General Beauregard's department being repaired.

CHARLESTON, October 5, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

(For Chief of Ordnance):

If small-arms called for by my chief of ordnance cannot be had will have to disband several six-months' regiments lately called out. They consume provisions uselessly.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.