War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0371 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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[Indorsements.]

OFFICE CHIEF Q. M., DEPT. S. C., GA., AND FLA.,

Charleston, September 23, 1863.

Respectfully referred to Major M. A. Pringle, for a report as to tools, &c.

HUTSON LEE,

Major and Chief Quartermaster.

QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

Charleston, September 23, 1863.

Respectfully returned to Major Lee.

I have already a workshop in the city, which can repair all the worn-out wagons in the neighborhood, but would request that General Wise be directed to order his mechanics to report for duty to me, as I require more labor; say, 10 wheelwrights and 5 blacksmiths. I am also making arrangements to establish a workshop at Orangeburg, where new wagons and ambulances can be made.

MOTTE A. PRINGLE,

Major and Quartermaster.

OFFICE CHIEF Q. M., DEPT. S. C., GA., AND FLA.,

Charleston, September 23, 1863.

Respectfully returned to department headquarters.

HUTSON LEE,

Major, and Chief Quartermaster.

CHARLESTON, S. C., September 22, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Permit me to address you on the subject of raids, which are certainly easily suppressed, and the damage done by one will oftentimes more than a thousand times pay for the means taken to prevent them.

The plan proposed is to detail an officer to superintend, and a sergeant, corporal, and private for each road on which a raid is apprehended; say, on seven roads leading to a city, 1 officer and 21 men, mounted, would be sufficient. The duties of these men will be to put down and take up subterra shells when a raid of the enemy is out, expected, or retired.

A raid of cavalry must confine themselves to roads, and the details above mentioned can plant in each road subterra shells, perfectly harmless to citizens, until the enemy approach, when the shell can be primed in a moment for their reception. I am confident that if the enemy are once or twice blown up by these means, raids ever three after will be prevented. This is all that can probably be done by the Confederate Government at this time, and should the plan made to report to me for instruction and material, I will communicate with the Governors of the different States, notifying them of the means to be employed, and request their co-operations in furnishing timely information.

I have the honor to be, with much esteem, your most obedient servant,

G. J. RAINS,

Brigadier-General, on Special Duty.