War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0312 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

Search Civil War Official Records

advancing gradually, protecting left flank well from batteries on James Island. Some of Sulivan's Island batteries will soon open on him, I hope with effect. Am still removing heavy guns from Sumter for interior lines of harbor defense.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

AUGUST 28, 1863.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

What is your effective force for defense of Charleston? Have Evans' and Colquitt's two remaining regiments rejoined you?

What is the number of militia and troops for local defense available when grand attack is certain?

What re-enforcements can be drawn from Savannah per railroad?

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

August 28, 1863-9.30 p. m.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President Confederate States, Richmond, Va.:

Effective total: 3,268 artillery, including twelve batteries; 9,600 infantry; 500 cavalry; Evans' and Colquitt's brigades, 650, militia included.

Not to exceed 4,000 militia can be expected to take the field.

I have already reduced force at Savannah to lowest possible number.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 28, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, C. S. Army, Richmond:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram, of the 27th instant, from the honorable Secretary of War, declining to send sailors from Savannah, and during the detail of men from the army, and I beg to submit the following:

This command has already been depleted of all men for the navy accustomed to water and boat service, and I have no more to detach. Men who have some knowledge of rowing are essential to keep up communications with Morris Island, the vital importance of which it is unnecessary to repeat here, and which must be cut off, without an addition force of boatmen, as I now solemnly warn the Department.

The iron-clads at Savannah are behind the shelter of heavy obstructions, and were a portion of their crews detached for temporary service here, they could be returned, in the event of an emergency there.

The defense of Savannah must depend upon a successful defense of Charleson. Let us save one place, if possible. I was expected by the Department to withdraw, in great part, my forces from Savan