War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0305 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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tween midnight and 2 this morning. Dispance, over 5 miles. Six buildings touched slightly. No injury to persons.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 24, 1863.

Commander J. R. TUCKER,

Flag-Officer, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The condition of Fort Sumter, its inability to offer further substantial reply, with heavy ordnance, to the enemy's fleet makes it in place for me ot acquaint you formally with the fact, and to ask you to take up a position with the three iron-clad under your command between Batteries bee and other works on Sulivan's Island and Fort Sumter, for the purpose of assisting in protecting the latter, and in preventing the United States iron-clads from passing into the harbor. It is believed you can take such a position under Fort Sumter as would shelter you from a flank fire from enemy's land batteries.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

August 25, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Enemy's fire maintained, as usual, chiefly from land batteries, owing to weather. Sumter received no additional injury to-day. Conference of engineers in Sumter decided it could be held, even in ruins. It will be done. A heavy demonstration made, with infantry, in front of Wagner this evening; reported from outposts as an assault. It was repulsed. No shells thrown into the city last night.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

August 25, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

The naval vessels here are short-handed. I regarded it essential that the iron-clads should take position alongside of Sumter, to support against coup de main. At some time navy have to assist with crews to keep up communication with Wagner. At least 50 sailors are essential. Can they not be spared for emergency from ships at Savannah, where they are in rear of obstructions, into in no danger of surprise? I urgently ask this detachment, with officers, to take charge of the boats crews.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

20 R R-VOL XXVIII, PT II