War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0296 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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cessfully attained. I am advised that I could not do better than to intrust the direction and control of this transportation exclusively to your discretion. You can better judge how far it may be necessary that such exclusive control should be vested in you; and I should be expedient, and it you would undertake the responsible duty. The importance of the object need not be pressed on your consideration, and, appreciating it fully, as you doubtless do, you will not, it is hoped, shrink from any effort or responsibility which your judgment indicates as necessary.

Very sincerely, your

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, August 20, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Charleston, S. C.:

It seems impossible to furnish you the artillerists you call for. We have not enough here to man the works around Richmond, which may be threatened at any moment, and none can be spared from the armies in other quarters. Those recently paroled at Vicksburg and Port Hudson have not been exchanged. They have gone west of the Mississippi, on furlough. Can you not convert some of your infantry into artillery, for ordinary purposes, and assign some of your instructed artillerists to the most important duties at the guns? In this way you might enlarge you artillery, and the infantry would soon learn the manual of the piece.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

August 20, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

The large Blakely guns at Wilmington should not be diverted from this place; both should come here at once. Cannot some of the Brooke guns from the Virginia, or other iron-clad, be sent here for defense of inner harbor? Effective positions for them are being prepared. Projectiles, of course.

J. F. GILMER,

Colonel, and Chief of Engineer Bureau.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 20, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel D. B. HARRIS,

Chief Engineer, Department, Charleston, S. C.:

COLONEL: As it is not probable at present that we shall be able to get the required number of heavy guns to arm the batteries at Fort Johnson and the Martello Tower, it is advisable to leave in position at the former the two rifled 32-pounders already there, but prepare at