War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0270 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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guns, which now that new are planned, could be better adopted than, it could then.

I will confine myself for the present to the use of siege guns. Let

two railroad tracks be put down, close to each other, behind an embankment or continuous parapet; place on them two platform cars, side by side and linked together; on these a platform is had at once for siege guns, and by moving with horses or by band (with ropes) a train of cars or battery of any number of guns cannot only be safely, economically, and expeditiously transported from one point to another, but an irresistible fire of artillery can be concentrated upon any given portion of the lines.

In a few words, such an arrangement would give at will to any position the artillery fire of the whole line.

Without urging the adoption of this plan for other points, there is one at present of great importance, where some features of it should, in my opinion, be carried out at once, to wit, on the new batteries (merely for the purpose of transportation from one to the other on a single track) from Legare's Point to Mellichamp's. A covered way has to be constructed from each of these batteries to the others; it can be used for running the siege batteries (as intended when they were planned) from Haskell to Battery Ryan, according as the fire may be desired on Light-House Inlet or on Moris Island, without danger to men or guns, and without the use of horses. Such rapid changes in the position of our guns would also baffle the enemy's artillerists.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AMBROSIO JOSE GONZALES,

Colonel, and Chief of Art., Commanding Art. on James Island.

[Indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 10, 1863.

This suggestion is there erotically good, but practically impracticable, with our present means. I would be well satisfied if a common, good dirt road could be made in rear of our defensive lines.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

CHARLESTON, S. C.,

August 10, 1863-7 a. m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Nothing of importance has occurred since telegram of yesterday. Evans' brigade is arriving at Savannah and Colquitt's regiments are arriving here.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 10, 1863.

JOHNSON HAGOOD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding:

GENERAL: Please make a detailed official report of the circumstances attending your several interviews with General Vogdes,