War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0258 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 4, 1863.

Brigadier General R. S. RIPLEY,

Commanding First Military District:

GENERAL: The enemy has a picket, it appears, at night in the Marsh Battery Creek, at or near the battery, for the purpose of observing and reporting when our steamers are at Cumming's Point. The commanding general desires to prevent this, if possible, and thinks it may be best done by the navy, to which end he wishes you to see, and, if possible, arrange with, Captain Tucker for this service.

The mouths of all the creek debouching on the cove between Morris Island and Shell Point (Battery Simkins) should be watchfully picketed at night, and, if practicable, the enemy's pickets, just alluded to, should be surprised and captured. A boat picket thrown out from Legare's Point, in the creek, might also be effective.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

CHARLESTON, S. C., August 5, 1863-7 a. m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

All quiet yesterday. No casualties on Morris Island. Defensive preparations till progressing.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C., August 5, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Enemy is still being largely re-enforced from the northward. Cannot General Coquitt's other regiments be ordered here at once? More troops are absolutely required.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

(Same to Major General W. H. C. Whiting, Wilmington, N. C.)

INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Charleston, August 5, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel A. ROMAN, Assistant Inspector-General:

COLONEL: In accordance with your instructions, detailing me

as the inspector for reporting on the intended operations with torpedoes in Light-House Inlet, I communicated yesterday with Captain Gray, the maker of these engines, and he informed me that they were prepared, but that Colonel Hatch, the officer in whose hands the execution of the operations lies, had not perfected his arrangements for their disposal. I did not see Colonel Hatch yesterday, after several attempts, but will endeavor to do so to-day and learn from him when the arrangements will be completed, and report to you accordingly.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. WEMYSS FEILDEN,

Captain, and Assistant Inspector-General.