War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0253 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 3, 1863.

D. B. HARRIS,

Lieutenant-Colonel, and Chief Engineer:

COLONEL: The commanding general wishes six floating torpedoes to be carried down Light-House Inlet, at night, and let loose as near the enemy's vessels as practicable. Colonel L. M. Hatch is a gentleman who, if provided with boats and torpedoes, could attend to the execution of their order, and wounded probably undertake it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN F. O'BRIEN,

Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 3, 1863.

Brigadier General H. W. MERCER,

Commanding Military District of Georgia, Savannah, Ga.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the commanding general to inform you that the detachment of 78 men belonging to the Sixty-third Georgia Volunteers, having become very much reduced by casualties and sickness, has been ordered to return to Savannah.

The general directs that you will forward a detachment of equal strength to fill the place of the one thus relieved, as soon as practicable.

I am instructed, further, to say that the general is happy to communicate to you the fact that Brigadier General N. G. Evans has been ordered to take position with his brigade at Savannah.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CLIFTON H. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 3, 1863.

Brigadier General R. S. RIPLEY,

Commanding First Military District, S. C., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs me to say that he wishes one banded and rifled 32-pounder sent to-night to Battery Wagner, to be mounted in place of the one which was burst some time ago; also one mortar, to be sent from Fort Sumter to Battery Gregg.

He also desires that you should furnish Fort Sumter and Sullivan's Island, at once, with everything in the way of provisions, ammunition, &c., that may be required for their prolonged defense, for, should the north end of Morris Island fall into the hands of the enemy, little, if any, intercourse by water could be kept up with those posts. For the same reason, he calls your attention specially to the immediate necessity of transporting to Sullivan's island all the guns and ammunition which can be spared from Fort Sumter. These matters cannot be attended to with too much expedition.

The movement of troops to Morris Island the general wishes so conducted that for the present there shall not be less than two regi-