War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0251 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 2, 1863.

D. B. HARRIS,

Lieutenant-Colonel, and Chief Engineer:

COLONEL: The commanding general directs that a battery for two 24-pounders be thrown up between Battery Beauregard and the new middle battery on Sullivan's Island, and that another shall be erected between the latter battery and Battery Marshall for two 32-pounders.

Two columbiad platforms in mortar batteries at Fort Johnson will be taken up and transferred to some point at which they may be needed, and their places supplied by platforms for barbette guns.

Have any of the spar torpedoes been set afloat in the Stono? If not, what is the obstacle to its being done?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

(Copy of first paragraph for Brigadier-General Ripley; of second, for Lieutenant-Colonel Waddy, chief of ordnance.)

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., August 2, 1863.

Captain J. R. TUCKER,

Commanding C. S. Naval Forces Afloat, Charleston Harbor, S. C.:

CAPTAIN: In reply to your request for my opinion whether the private steam vessels which have been seized by you "can render more important service by going abroad than by being retained for the defense of the harbor," I have to say, that I am convinced the time for their effective employment for the defense of this harbor is now, in some effort to destroy at night the Ironsides and other iron-clad vessels of the enemy, which are being formidably used for the reduction of our works on Morris Island. If they are not speedily applied to that end, or cannot be with sufficient hope of success to warrant or induce the attempt, but are to be held in the inner harbor, only to be resorted to in the last extremity against iron-clads that shall have overpowered our out-works and reduced or passed Forts Sumter an Moultrie, then I am clearly satisfied their further retention as a means of defense is useless, and that it will be far better to release them at once, as requested by the Quartermaster's Department, to be sent abroad for military supplies.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

CHARLESTON, August 2, 1863.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I am in receipt of your communication of yesterday, and would respectfully report that the additional cutwater is being prepared for torpedo ram.

In obedience to the commanding general's instructions, I submitted the plan of attaching spar torpedoes to the sides of the vessel to