War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0237 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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You can scarcely feel more solicitous than myself for the safety of Charleston, and will not doubt that all that can be consistently done to secure that success for which we earnestly pray will be freely performed.

I fear the effect of a protracted siege. The enemy, with far greater resources and numbers than ourselves, can more readily supply any loss which may be sustained, and, if more troops can be advantageously used, will, after his success on the Mississippi, be able to furnish the requisite number.

The season, it is to be hoped, will prove injurious to Northern men, exposed, as they must be, on the beach of Morris Island.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

CHARLESTON, S. C., July 28, 1863 - 7 a. m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Yesterday, being windy, enemy's fleet did not engage our batteries, which shelled his approaches and works on Morris Island. Last night was quiet. Another monitor has been added to the five already here.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

CHARLESTON, S. C., July 28, 1863 - 1.30 p. m.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Many transports of enemy are arriving with troops. At least 2,500 men more are required at present for James Island. Can they not be ordered here immediately? Enemy's land and naval batteries are now playing on Wagner, which replies bravely, with Gregg and Sumter.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF ARTILLERY,

Charleston, July 28, 1863.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to recommend what I consider an urgent and important policy in our disposition of heavy artillery, to wit, that the Brooke and other heavy rifled guns at Sumter and Batteries Simkins* and Cheves,* bearing upon Morris Island, be at once replaced by 8 and 10-inch columbiads, and that the heavy rifled guns be placed upon the sea faces of our works, for the following reasons:

First. The rifled guns, as shows by experience, will not stand a rapid and continuous fire.

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* NOTE ON ORIGINAL. - None there.

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