War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0225 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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feel for the future, but must recall to their mind that every effort made toward an effectual defense of Charleston is really the surest way to defend Savannah. A successful war cannot be carried on without a concentration, at the proper time, of all the available forces at command, on the decisive point.

By the concentration of the resources of this department for the defense of Charleston only can this city be saved from falling into the hands of the enemy, and were it to fall, the reduction of Savannah could not be far distant. It is in the division and dispersion of forces that our dangers lie. Our enemy, baffled before Charleston, will not be in condition to fall suddenly upon and take Savannah by a coup de main, even were her means of defense far less substantial than they actually are.

It is the wish of the commanding general that those defenses were more complete, and more up to the standard of his plans. If the city council of Savannah, however, will supply the labor, which he has sought in vain so often to secure, to complete the works under construction, he will engage, in due season, to furnish more troops and guns than have been withdrawn.

I beg that your fellow-citizens will be trustful that all things practicable shall be done for their defense.

At present there are no arms, but some have been sent for, the use of which is promised the commanding general.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS JORDAN,

Brigadier-General, and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., July 24, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel D. B. HARRIS,

Chief Engineer, & c.:

COLONEL: Examine condition for resistance of Battery Wagner, and report in person as soon as possible. Explain to General Taliaferro that we must fight the fleet with sand; that the battery originally was only meant to defend against land approach. The battery must be held as long as possible, even twenty-four hours are important.

Respectfully, & c.,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., July 24, 1863.

Brigadier General R. S. RIPLEY, & c.:

GENERAL: The batteries designed to render Batteries Wagner and Gregg untenable by enemy, if reduced, not being completed, it has become exigent that these last batteries shall be held to the last extremity. Wagner, being under guns of Sumter and Gregg, should be held by infantry and siege guns alone, until its parapets and bomb-proofs are destroyed, and no longer afford shelter against artillery. The general regards it almost improbable that another assault will be attempted.

15 R R - VOL XXVIII, PT II