War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0037 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

what direction. If you will direct him to see me, there will be no difficulty in making the desired arrangements.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. A. DAHLGREN,

Rear-Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Sqaudron.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, D. C., August 5, 1863.

Brigadier General J. W. RIPLEY,

Chief of Ordnance, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you will at once purchase and turn over to the Quartermaster's Department, for shipment to General Gillmore, commanding the Department of the South, 40 gross of Mr. Short's Greek-fire, to be used in the operations before Charleston.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JAS. A. HARDIE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., August 5, 1863.

Admiral DAHLGREN,

Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, off Charleston, S. C.:

ADMIRAL: In reference to the probability of our being able to cut off or seriously interfere with the enemy's supplies of men and provisions on this island, I would say that a calcium light has been ordered from New York, and ought to reach here in the Fulton in about eight days from this time. With it I expect to be able to illuminate Cumming's Point, so that my batteries and your boats can see it distinctly and be themselves in deep darkness. I hope and believe that we can effect satisfactory results with it.

I inclose a letter from Assistant Surgeon Luck, U. S. Navy, which I supposed had been sent some days ago.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

In the Field, Morris Island, S. C., August 5, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: Your two letters of the 22nd ultimo, one of them being in reply to mine of the 18th, have been received.

You express yourself at a loss to perceive the necessity for my statement that I should expect full compliance on your part with the usages of war among civilized nations, "in their unrestricted application to all the forces under my command."

At that time I considered my remarks as pertinent and proper.