War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0026 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

In the Field, Morris Island, S. C., July 22, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: It has been the source of great mortification to me to be informed that, through some misapprehension yesterday, a flag of truce was apparently not treated with that respect to which its sacred character entitles it.

After a careful examination into the matter, I am able to assure the commander of the Confederate forces about Charleston, though I scarcely deem such an assurance necessary, that the irregularity was purely the result of misconception, and will be scrupulously guarded against hereafter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., July 22, 1863.

Rear-Admiral DAHLGREN,

Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, off Morris Island:

DEAR SIR: I am just in receipt of your three letters, two of yesterday and one to-day, and hasten to reply to them in one communication.

First. We agree that a third assault of Fort Wagner cannot be made at the present time. I have made two that were unsuccessful, and do not feel authorized to risk a third just now.

Second. In regard to the safety of my depot at Hilton Head, I admit that I feel some concern.

You will doubtless remember, admiral, that it was arranged between us-I so understood it, at least-that the Wabash and Vermont should both lie abreast of my depot at Hilton Head during our operations here, just as they did during the last attack on the Charleston defenses. It has been necessary to take the Wabash away, however, in your operations here, and as a consequence I have been obliged to send troops from Morris Island to Hilton Head.

I feel, as doubtless you do, that thorough co-operation between the army and the navy is desirable, and that neither branch of the service can at the present moment advance alone. Each has already failed once in the attempt to do so. Too much would be risked if my depots at Port Royal and vicinity were less strongly guarded now than they were at the last attack on Charleston. The navy then kept a gunboat in Calibogue Sound. There is none there now, and I have not requested it, although I feel great concern for the weakness of Hilton Head Island in that direction.

Third. I accept the Whitworth guns and the officers and crews with them, and thank you for the same. I presume you will send one officer to command the whole; if so, when he reports for duty I will assign him a position, give him the necessary general instructions, and afford him facilities for getting up his ordnance and ordnance stores. His guns and men will, of course, remain under his immediate control.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.