War of the Rebellion: Serial 047 Page 0021 Chapter XL. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

the right in each battery. The shells should be exploded in or directly over Fort Wagner.

By order of Brigadier General Q. A. Gillmore:

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Captain LOOMIS L. LANGDON,

First U. S. Art., Commanding Batteries Reynolds and Weed.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., July 20, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication dated the 4th instant, written "with a view of effecting some understanding as to the future conduct of the war in this quarter."*

Passing over without comment, as purely irrelevant, your severe strictures upon certain military operations of my predecessor commanding this department, I will simply state that, while I shall scrupulously endeavor to conduct the war upon principles well established by usage among civilized nations, I shall also expect from the commanding general opposed to me a full compliance with the same rules and maxims in their unrestricted application to all the forces under my command.

It was a source of no little surprise to me that your communication was sent by way of the blockading fleet off Charleston, while our respective pickets on this island are within speaking distance of each other, and are considerably nearer to your headquarters than any portion of our naval forces.

I respectfully suggest that hereafter communication for me, to which my attention is at all desirable, be sent through my own lines.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

FLAG-STEAMER DINSMORE,

Off Morris Island, S. C., July 20, 1863.

Brigadier General Q. A. GILLMORE,

Commanding Department of the South, Morris Island, S. C.:

DEAR SIR: I hope our efforts will be more successful next time. Indeed, it is very important they should be, for each time we fail the enemy obtains some notice of a weak point and strengthens it, so that the whole ground from Fort Wagner will be entrenched eventually.

Permit me to suggest, therefore, that our trenches should be pushed to the nearest point deemed advisable, armed plentifully with artillery and pioneered by rifle-pits. When ready, I will support you with the vessels, and hope to quell the fire of the fort and drive the garrison to shelter. When the assault takes place in front, I would

---------------

*See page 11.

---------------