War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0708 S.C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E.FLA. Chapter XL.

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told Colonel Butler I was afraid it was our own boat. He replied that if it was she had no business there without giving us notice, but if I believed it was our boat I had better cease firing. He then left the fort, and with the aid of a glass I saw a small boat coming. I then again ordered the fire to cease, which was instantly done.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

FORT MOULTRIE, September 3, 1863.

Major DE TREVILLE, Commanding Fort Moultrie:

MAJOR: I have the honor to make the following statement in connection with the firing into the steamer Sumer on the morning of the 31st of August:

For weeks past the garrison at this post had been on the alert for the approach, at night, of the enemy's iron-clad fleet. On the night of the 30th, about tattoo, a dispatch was received from district headquarters, enjoining extra vigilance, as it was probable the monitors would make another demonstration. Consequently officers and men were sleeping at their guns, when, about 1 a. m. on the 31st, a boat was discovered at the distance of about 3,000 yards approaching form the direction of the enemy's fleet. Previously the monitors had been seen to approach from the same direction, and about the same hour of the morning; and taking into consideration the facts that no boats are allowed to pass the fort at night, that special vigilance had been enjoined, and that with the aid of a glass the precise nature of the boat could not be determined, it was of course thought to come from the enemy. Fire was immediately opened, when, after 4 or 5 shots, a small light (apparently a candle) was seen for awhile, then disappeared. The boat gave no signal that could be seen or heard, not even that of an ordinary blockade-runner. But as Battery Gregg was silent and displayed a signal light, and as the boat had stopped, the firing had for the most part ceased, when a small boat came ashore, bringing the intelligence that it was the Sumter with troops from Morris Island. Subsequently to the arrival of the small boat, a dispatch came from Morris Island. Subsequently to the arrival of the small boat, a dispatch came from Sumter to the following effect; "You are firing upon the Chesterfield from Fort Moultrie."

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. M. CRESWELL,

Lieutenant, and Ordnance Officer, Sullivans' Island.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

FORT MOULTRIE, September 3, 1863.

Major R. DE TREVILLE, Commanding Fort Moultrie:

MAJOR: Sunday morning last, the 30th August, the long roll was sounded at Fort Moultrie, where I was located at the time, and a boat was distinctly seen by me from the parapet of the fort. I could not discern any lights or signals of nay description, either form the boat or from Fort Sumter. I had been informed the evening previous that a telegram had been received from the brigadier-general commanding to keep a sharp lookout for vessels coming in. I heard no whistle, or noise of any kind that would designate the vessel to be a friendly one until the captain of the boat landed, when the firing ceased.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. S. MOWRY,

Ordnance Officer, Drayton's Brigade.