War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0655 Chapter XL. BOMBARDMENT OF FORT SUMTER, S. C.

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at the fort and probably two in serviceable condition; also two or three 42-pounder rifled guns, banded; these will be suitable guns to arm the casemates when placed in readiness. Carriages will have to be repaired and new ones made, probably, for the 10-inch columbiads.

I respectfully state that I observed through last evening and night more firing from our batteries than had been customary for three or four preceding days. This is not in accordance with the views expressed by you to me yesterday. I am not informed as to the cause of the increased firing.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. GILMER,

Major-General, and Second in Command.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C.,

Charleston, September 23, 1863.

Colonel Harris was this day ordered verbally to put in position in casemates designated, well protected from rear and vertical fires, two 10-inch columbiads; one 42-pounder rifled; one 32-pounder rifled.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

HDQRS. 5TH MIL. DIST., DEPT. S. C., GA., AND FLA.,

Charleston, November 13, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to state that in pursuance of the views of the commanding general, having visited Fort Sumter in company with Colonel Harris, and consulted with Captain Johnson, of the Engineer Corps, and Major Elliott, commanding, I have the honor to submit the following views:

1. I find that there are eight casemates outside of the bomb-proofs to be held by our men, now capable of sheltering some 500 or 600 men from mortar shell.

2. That any mine capable of blowing up Abolitionists taking shelter in said casemates and causing the debris to fall upon and crush them would be liable to the objection that the blast would be dangerous to our own men.

3. That mines and torpedoes are uncertain, and not to be relied on entirely.

4. That should they explode it might be still within the power of the enemy to throw re-enforcements of sufficient power into the work.

5. That shell thrown into a work with high walls from a distance of 1,500 to 1,800 yards (the distance of our batteries from Sumter), cannot be relied on alone to reduce the work, as the loss of life is not as great as might be apprehended, as shown by the bombardment of Battery Wagner and of Fort Sumter within the last few days. Twelve hundred and seventy-one have been fired; 826 have struck, and 5 negroes and 2 soldiers have been slightly wounded.

6. That the bomb-proofs are not now in a condition to be available for offensive operations against an enemy established in the fort.

7. That our great advantage over the enemy in our present position is an effective fire, at short range, upon an enemy in barges, com-